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What is Emotional Intelligence and Why should I Care?

Posted on November 15, 2016 at 3:40 AM

What is Emotional Intelligence? Why Should I Care?

by Author/Blogger: Coach Jane Loya Ryan

What is Emotional Intelligence? Let’s begin with the fact that Emotional Intelligence (sometimes referred to as EQ or EI) is a huge and powerful skill everyone can develop to become more successful in life and career. During the early 1990s, Peter Salovey (Yale University) and John D. Mayer, (University of New Hampshire) researched and presented the framework for emotional intelligence (EI) as, "the subset of social intelligence and they posited EI involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions" (Salovey & Mayer, 1990). People who have honed the skill of emotional intelligence are better at understanding and expressing their own emotions, recognizing emotions in others, regulating the affect of emotions and use moods and emotions to motivate and drive adaptive behaviors. EI is a skill that when continuously honed helps individuals achieve “self-actualization”—aka—reach your full potential in one’s life and career. Emotional Intelligence allows us to adapt to either internal or external events and potentially lead us into a transformation of personal interaction that can enrich our lives through positive experiences. Salovey and Mayer’s Model can be viewed as follows:

In 1995, the concept of emotional intelligence was significantly popularized after the publication of psychologist and New York Times science writer Daniel Goleman’s book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Goleman presented the case that emotional intelligence was just as important as one’s intelligence quotient, if not more important. He stated, “The rules for work are changing. We’re being judged by a new yardstick—not just by how smart we are, or by our training and expertise, but also by how well we handle each other and ourselves. This yardstick is increasingly applied in choosing who will be hired and who will not, who will be let go and who retained, who passed over and who promoted” (Goleman, 1995). When Goleman refers to how well we handle each other’s emotions and our own, he is describing was is called “intrapersonal intelligence” which is one’s ability to detect, differential and regulate emotions” and “interpersonal intelligence” which involves our ability to monitor other’s moods and temperaments and then take this knowledge into consideration to predict a person’s future reactions or behaviors (Gardner, 1983). Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence Model is as follows:

Why Should I Care? Daniel Goleman explained the WIFM (what’s in it for me) very well when he said the yardstick used to measure who gets the job, raise, or promotion has changed and this change calls for individuals to strengthen their emotional intelligence in order to be more successful in life and in careers. Current research now points to emotional intelligence as the missing link between people with average performance and those with star performance in life and in careers. Studies show 90% of high performing individuals also have high emotional intelligence and individuals with high emotional intelligence out perform individuals with solely high IQ 70% of the time (Bradberry, 2015). Travis Bradberry is the author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0. In his book he posits, “Emotional intelligence is responsible for 58% of a person’s performance” (Bradberry, 2015). So what are you doing to develop, improve, strengthen yours? Travis Bradberry’s emotional intelligence model is as follows:

Bradberry (2015).

As you can see from these three emotional intelligence models, the foundational behaviors of EI all include self-awareness, self-management, awareness of others and relationship management in some form or fashion. If you care about becoming all that you can be in life and in your career, emotional intelligence is a skill that you should understand, develop, strengthen and apply in your day-to-day lives and work. It boils down to our ability to have sufficient awareness of our personal and social competencies so that we can effectively interact with others in more positive ways. Emotional Intelligence is the special ingredient in our ability to adapt and compete in today’s rapidly changing world. It is time to be all that you can be! Carpe Diem! What Can I Do To Strengthen My Emotional Intelligence? Emotional intelligence enables us to communicate more effectively. It begins deep within the central area of our brain’s limbic system called the “Amygdala”—this is where our emotions are generated. The Amygdala is where primal senses such as fight or flight take place. When our emotions are generated due to events that are taking place and stimulating the neuro-pathways in our brain they travel to the frontal lobe of our brain where executive and cognitive abilities are rationalized and emotions are exhibited. Emotional intelligence is the foundation for critical thinking and the driver of how well we emotionally understand our own emotions and those of others. Strong emotional intelligence ultimately enables us to align with others and achieve more positive outcomes from every interaction.

Okay, so what can I do to strengthen my EI? Begin with a good dose of self-awareness—take an emotional intelligence assessment, and then understand your emotional intelligence level. Research, find and engage an emotional intelligence coach—someone who can teach you techniques and ways to measurably learn and apply techniques to strengthen your EQ on a daily basis.

Learning how to effectively apply techniques is not something that just happens overnight, although once learned your commitment to apply techniques and new ways of thinking can help you strengthen your EI. For example, at Jane Ryan & Associates, we coach our clients on the following techniques. While they seem like no brainer’s—it is HOW you apply them that counts.

1. Stop, Breathe, Think then Speak (SBTS)

2. 5W’s and HOW

3. Listen Actively

4. Question Effectively

5. Paraphrase

6. Think Critically, Creatively, Strategically

7. Apply Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

8. Understand Personalities

9. Daily Focus & Mindfulness Time

10. Critical Reflective Journaling

If you would like to learn how to strengthen your emotional intelligence and you are ready to acquire the missing ingredient in your life and career—let us know and contact us today—we would love to help!  Call Coach Jane at 214-500-7223 or Email Coach Jane at [email protected] or Go to her website for more information at www.JaneRyanAssociates.com.  

Categories: Blogger/Author: Jane Ryan, Emotional Intelligence (EQi), Careers

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1 Comment

Reply Mindvalley
5:06 AM on January 17, 2019 
I do consider all the ideas you have offered to your post. They?re really convincing and can definitely work.
https://blog.mindvalley.com/intrapersonal-intelligence/