International EI & Futurist Executive Coach, Leadership Transformation and Career Coach  
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Jane Ryan & Associates, LLC

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INFOGRAPHIC: Choose AI in Business Adventure

Posted on June 17, 2019 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

INFOGRAPHIC: Choose Your AI in Business Adventure

Techopedia Staff | June 17, 2019

Presented by: AltaML


Choose Your AI in Business Adventure


INFOGRAPHIC: Choose AI in Business Adventure

Posted on June 17, 2019 at 7:05 PM Comments comments (0)

 

 

INFOGRAPHIC: Choose Your AI in Business Adventure

Techopedia Staff | June 17, 2019

Presented by: AltaML

Choose Your AI in Business Adventure


 

Machine Learning and Why It Matters

Posted on June 17, 2019 at 7:05 PM Comments comments (0)

https://www.techopedia.com/14/33517/trends/machine-learning-and-why-it-matters


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Does Your Resume Float Their Boat?

Posted on May 11, 2019 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (5)

Does Your Resume "Float Their Boat?"

In today's rapidly changing and highly competitive business environments, job seekers are often lost at sea when it comes to knowing how to best navigate the dark waters of career transition and keep your resume from sinking to the bottom of someone's stake. That's if you are lucky enough to have it first float to the top through the shark infested black holes of the Internet and the vast stingrays of applicant tracking systems. Did you know? The average time spent by a hiring manager or recruiter is less than 7 seconds? This means you must "capture them at hello", "first sight" intrigue them enough that they can't help but want to know more about you and read on.

Did you know? When writing your resume for a specific job application online takes discipline, focus and expertise to not only capture "keywords" but which keywords? It takes knowing "how" to write in a way that visually catches the "eye" of the applicant tracking system (ATS) and then the human reading your resume for the first time—two different sets of eyes and both need to be done in just the right way to float your resume to the top.

Did you know? Writing your resume today is both a science and an art? No longer are the days of just throwing together a chronological list of where you worked and what you did. Today, it is oh so much different and can be hard to know just what to do without help from an expert. Everyone out there seems to have an opinion on what they believe is the best way to write your resume.

So, what do you do to have the greatest chance of making it above sea level? First, be the captain of your ship. In other words, embrace this time in your life with discipline, focus and a genuine desire to find what works best for you. You will need patience, commitment, and perseverance at times.

However, the good news is once you learn how to do it right, each time it will become easier and faster for you to apply to "best-fit jobs" and your own eyes will quickly pick up the keywords in a job description that you also possess in your treasure chest of skills, competencies, and experiences.

Okay, so how do I write my resume effectively so that I not only get recognized but I intrigue them enough to get an interview?

Great questions! I wanted to make sure that what I share with you is not only my advice that has been honed for over a decade of critiquing and rewriting thousands of resumes but it also takes into consideration what the guru's of resume writing believe are "best practice" today. The following are the most common themes experts are saying. "

The most important action a job seeker needs to take RE: their resume is to not only list their keywords on their resume, but to repeat them. This is called "search engine optimization" in the business world and it's how companies get their websites to appear at the top of a Google search. It's the same way resumes appear at the top of a list in Applicant Tracking Systems." Abby Kohut

"Two things that jump to mind for ATS: -current keywords directly related to the target function, minimizing or eliminating language around work style or interpersonal skills. While these will be important to a candidate's final selection, on a resume "team-player" or "detail-oriented" are not as impactful and take up valuable resume real estate space. Regarding format: A clean format that is easy to read will get through an ATS. No tables, pictures, or. pdfs. For real people reading resumes, in addition to the above comments, a resume should have a clear focus on supportive experiences and accomplishments. The ultimately distinguished preference is having an internal contact walk your resume to the reader. Employee referrals have such a high retention rate (last I read was 90%) many resume readers welcome a referral to help with the first stages of the selection process. (I know I do!)" Alyson Frederico

"A couple of my thoughts on resumes: 1) Brand yourself on your resume. Tell people "what you do" in your headline under your contact info, and then share some of those points in your summary. Very important to "customize" the Summary section of your resume, to show the fit to the job being sought. 2) Include relevant Key Words in your resume. Review the skills and experience being sought, and then make sure you use the right words to show you are a "match" for what they are seeking. Don't make the reader guess, and don't mislead your expertise either. 3) After developing a solid resume, brand yourself on LinkedIn. Be consistent, so that you present the best of "you" on LinkedIn that is consistently shared in your resume. The Summary section on LinkedIn provides a larger platform to share more information and some stories and accomplishments that will make you more memorable too!" Gayle Bridgeman

"Avoid Common Resume Buzzwords—While you review your resume for keywords, keep an eye out for overused buzzwords as well. Many job candidates include vague, generic terms that companies have learned to ignore—and programmed their ATSs to ignore. Given the context engines used by ATS, there are certain words that should be avoided: "can work independently," "detail-oriented," "dynamic," "problem-solver," and a number of variations on "success"—including "succeeded," "successful," and "successfully." It's best to be straightforward. Using job-specific, skill-specific keywords and avoiding filler terms is the best way to make sure that your entry reflects your fit with the available position. Candidates can certainly get lost in the resume abyss of the applicant tracking system. Resumes that get too creative with their wording can easily confuse ATS software to the point where it rejects the applicant." Dirk Spencer, Corporate Recruiter

"In my humble opinion, jobseekers need to use the language of the job posting when placing the experiences they have (that are a match to what the company is looking for). Jobseekers absolutely need to address the needs shown in the job posting, rather than just applying with a resume that shows wonderful experiences but not related to the job posting needs. I see many resumes when I post positions but very few (I hate to say) have been customized to show me the relevant experience I am looking for. Foster Williams

Feel free to reach out to anyone of the experts mentioned in this blog and join their LinkedIn!

Coaching for Career Transition Success!

Posted on December 12, 2016 at 5:05 AM Comments comments (0)

Coaching for Career Transition Success! by Author and Blogger, Coach Jane Loya Ryan

Transformational Coaching creates a coaching model with processes and techniques and a new approach to personal growth through transformation. Transformational Coaching leads by example using processes like “active listening, powerful open questioning, problem solving, self regulation and observation. Transformational Coaching applies transformational learning theory components like critical thinking, creative thinking, objective and reflective thinking, collaboration and consensus building. It then leverages individual reflections into development and individualized coaching plans specific to meet the needs of the individual(s).

Transformational Coaching is used to assess, strengthen and create development programs that address transformational learning to achieve optimal success. Transformational Coaching combines Emotional Intelligence Coaching and Effective Communication Coaching. Coaching that drives personal performance and enables one’s ability to identify & achieve personal & professional goals. Whether an individual is seeking career coaching, leadership development coaching, executive coaching, relationship coaching or any coaching to change behaviors and enhance performance to identify & reach personal & professional goals, Transformational Coaching can benefit those individuals who genuinely want to engage in coaching to become better, stronger, and/or more successful in life and in business.

Transformational Coaching helps individuals strengthen skills in areas such as: Emotional Intelligence Skill Building • Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Skill Building—(Intrapersonal intelligence is being intelligent in picking up what is going on inside of us and doing what we need to do about it [self-awareness and self-regard]; and Interpersonal intelligence [awareness of others and regard for others] is being intelligent & sensitive in picking up what is going on in other people and between other people and doing what we need to do about it.) These two types of intelligence are connected to emotional intelligence.

• Mayer & Salovey: "People high in emotional intelligence are expected to progress more quickly through the abilities designated and to master more of them." From “What is Emotional Intelligence” in Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications, by Peter Salovey and David Sluyter. 1997

• Daniel Goleman: “People high in emotional intelligence demonstrate a human ability to focus on personal qualities, such as initiative and empathy, adaptability and persuasiveness.” From “Working with Emotional Intelligence” (Goleman, 1998 ).

Coaching can bring you success through Communication Skill Building • 5Ws and HOW • Paraphrasing for Clarity • Asking Open-Ended Questions • Actively Listening • Positive Body Language • Emotional Intelligence to Assess, Align and Deliver Career Coaching for Success! • Assessments of personality, emotional intelligence, critical and creative thinking, strengths and areas for development • Tailored coaching advice and guidance rather than “one size fits all” • Identification of Goals, Objectives and Gap Analysis then Building a Plan to Achieve • Emotional Intelligence to Align and Build Rapport • Effective Communications – the 5Ws and HOW, Paraphrasing, Open-ended Questions, Active-Listening, Body Language, Empathy • Critical and Creative Thinking • Resume as a marketing tool – Getting Noticed • Focus on your Intention to gain Attention • Personal Branding and Presence and Style • Presenting with Intention to gain Attention • Assertiveness and Self-Confidence • How to build effective career transition collateral (Resume, LinkedIn Profile, Professional Biography, Business Cards, Professional Photo) • Taking oneself to market – targeting prospective employers or self-employment or entrepreneurial ventures • Networking is Building Relationships • Leveraging Social Media • Interviewing and Negotiating in business • Leverage Strengths and Communicating Accomplishments to Differentiate • Dress for Success and Creating a Professional and Positive Image • Reflective Journaling for Self-Motivated, Self-Directed Continuous Improvement

2016 is almost a clouded mist behind us as we are less than 2 months away from 2017. I had amazing speaking engagements in 2016 and have a few more to go wrapping up the year with the Fort Worth Career Search Network on November 21st and December 12th.  And I am excited to already have a lineup for 2017. More speaking engagements are planned at the Fort Worth Career Search Network in Februrary, Frisco Connect Career Search Network, early Spring and at the Southlake Focus Group, early Summer to where I am blessed to be able to spend time with jobseekers of all levels and present my Emotional Intelligence workshop and How to Build a Strengths Based Resume.

I am especially excited about bringing my MOM, WOW and GUYS Group Coaching Workshops back by popular demand beginning in January the 9th, 16th and 23rd and 3 more are planned for each quarter in 2017!  Go to Upcoming Workshops and Events tab and sign up. These are so dynamic and valuable for everyone in career transition.

Finding Your Career Fit Takes an Investment in Yourself–Contact me to start Coaching for Success today!

[email protected]

Believe in Your Strengths & Abilities!

Posted on November 16, 2016 at 10:25 PM Comments comments (0)

“He who believes he can and he who believes he cannot are both correct.” -Henry Ford

During career transition, we find ourselves tossed into a turbulent season called the "unknown".  If you find yourself in this season of life and career, there are a few things you can do to navigate this seasonal storm.

1) Take a few deep cleansing breaths and know, you are not alone and the sky is not falling! God has simply closed one door to open one much greater in the scope of life and career to come. So, Stop, Breathe, Think, then Take Action into your Future knowing you are going to be refined, strengthened and come out on the other side better than you ever were before. Like silver needs to be refined before it will sparkle and shine, we too, must enter the heat of life and career events and be refined to then shine for self and others.

2) Start every morning before you do anything (except possibly that cup of coffee or tea) and go outside, before it gets too hot (so that means early) and simply be "grateful"--this is your time alone to meditate, pray and set your intentions for each day in positive ways. What we intend to do becomes what we pay attention to and achieve. This becomes our daily "mindfulness" practice. Discipline yourself to do this every morning and you will see a positive difference take place in your life very quickly.

3) Begin a weekly critical reflective journal. Critically reflecting each week upon what went well this week and why? What did you do that made you feel this week went well? Then write it down. Followed by What didn't go so well this week and why? What did you do that made you feel it did not go as well as you would have liked? Then write it down. Lastly, If you could hit the "redo button" and have a "do over" What could you have done differently to have achieved a different and positive outcome? Then write it down. This should only take 15 minutes maximum. Discipline yourself to do this, you will see trends of strengths and personal achievements as well as overcoming obstacles with every week you focus, critically reflect and commit to doing this. 

4) Now Connect, Converse and Create. Connecting with others is a critical skill necessary to communicate well. Strenthening your emotional intelligence* can help you connect and move forward. Conversing with others is your ability to hold a meaningful 2-way conversation with someone. Creating an environment where there is rapport and trust and a fluid exchange of dialogue getting to the purpose of any interaction. 

5) Begin the journey, engage a coach and get started entering your new fibrant and exciting season in life and career.

*Learn how to strengthen your emotional intelligence by contacting, Coach Jane today for more information, programs and pricing designed to positively help you strengthen your EQi and transform your life and/or career and achieve your dreams!

Since the early 1990s Coach Jane has been intrigued and passionate about learning deeply about emotional intelligence and the amazing value it brings to all of us in our day-to-day lives. So, interested that her doctoral dissertation is focused on building measureable techniques that can strengthen specific EQi competencies and overall EQi score as well. She has incorporated these 15 techniques into her coaching methodolgy and most recently is offering aspiring coaches that are just as passionate about helping others through coaching become Certified in her EQi Coaching Method. If you are interested in learning more about how to become Certified in the next generation of EQi Coaching Methodology, contact Coach Jane today!

What is Emotional Intelligence and Why should I Care?

Posted on November 15, 2016 at 3:40 AM Comments comments (1)

What is Emotional Intelligence? Why Should I Care?

by Author/Blogger: Coach Jane Loya Ryan

What is Emotional Intelligence? Let’s begin with the fact that Emotional Intelligence (sometimes referred to as EQ or EI) is a huge and powerful skill everyone can develop to become more successful in life and career. During the early 1990s, Peter Salovey (Yale University) and John D. Mayer, (University of New Hampshire) researched and presented the framework for emotional intelligence (EI) as, "the subset of social intelligence and they posited EI involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions" (Salovey & Mayer, 1990). People who have honed the skill of emotional intelligence are better at understanding and expressing their own emotions, recognizing emotions in others, regulating the affect of emotions and use moods and emotions to motivate and drive adaptive behaviors. EI is a skill that when continuously honed helps individuals achieve “self-actualization”—aka—reach your full potential in one’s life and career. Emotional Intelligence allows us to adapt to either internal or external events and potentially lead us into a transformation of personal interaction that can enrich our lives through positive experiences. Salovey and Mayer’s Model can be viewed as follows:

In 1995, the concept of emotional intelligence was significantly popularized after the publication of psychologist and New York Times science writer Daniel Goleman’s book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Goleman presented the case that emotional intelligence was just as important as one’s intelligence quotient, if not more important. He stated, “The rules for work are changing. We’re being judged by a new yardstick—not just by how smart we are, or by our training and expertise, but also by how well we handle each other and ourselves. This yardstick is increasingly applied in choosing who will be hired and who will not, who will be let go and who retained, who passed over and who promoted” (Goleman, 1995). When Goleman refers to how well we handle each other’s emotions and our own, he is describing was is called “intrapersonal intelligence” which is one’s ability to detect, differential and regulate emotions” and “interpersonal intelligence” which involves our ability to monitor other’s moods and temperaments and then take this knowledge into consideration to predict a person’s future reactions or behaviors (Gardner, 1983). Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence Model is as follows:

Why Should I Care? Daniel Goleman explained the WIFM (what’s in it for me) very well when he said the yardstick used to measure who gets the job, raise, or promotion has changed and this change calls for individuals to strengthen their emotional intelligence in order to be more successful in life and in careers. Current research now points to emotional intelligence as the missing link between people with average performance and those with star performance in life and in careers. Studies show 90% of high performing individuals also have high emotional intelligence and individuals with high emotional intelligence out perform individuals with solely high IQ 70% of the time (Bradberry, 2015). Travis Bradberry is the author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0. In his book he posits, “Emotional intelligence is responsible for 58% of a person’s performance” (Bradberry, 2015). So what are you doing to develop, improve, strengthen yours? Travis Bradberry’s emotional intelligence model is as follows:

Bradberry (2015).

As you can see from these three emotional intelligence models, the foundational behaviors of EI all include self-awareness, self-management, awareness of others and relationship management in some form or fashion. If you care about becoming all that you can be in life and in your career, emotional intelligence is a skill that you should understand, develop, strengthen and apply in your day-to-day lives and work. It boils down to our ability to have sufficient awareness of our personal and social competencies so that we can effectively interact with others in more positive ways. Emotional Intelligence is the special ingredient in our ability to adapt and compete in today’s rapidly changing world. It is time to be all that you can be! Carpe Diem! What Can I Do To Strengthen My Emotional Intelligence? Emotional intelligence enables us to communicate more effectively. It begins deep within the central area of our brain’s limbic system called the “Amygdala”—this is where our emotions are generated. The Amygdala is where primal senses such as fight or flight take place. When our emotions are generated due to events that are taking place and stimulating the neuro-pathways in our brain they travel to the frontal lobe of our brain where executive and cognitive abilities are rationalized and emotions are exhibited. Emotional intelligence is the foundation for critical thinking and the driver of how well we emotionally understand our own emotions and those of others. Strong emotional intelligence ultimately enables us to align with others and achieve more positive outcomes from every interaction.

Okay, so what can I do to strengthen my EI? Begin with a good dose of self-awareness—take an emotional intelligence assessment, and then understand your emotional intelligence level. Research, find and engage an emotional intelligence coach—someone who can teach you techniques and ways to measurably learn and apply techniques to strengthen your EQ on a daily basis.

Learning how to effectively apply techniques is not something that just happens overnight, although once learned your commitment to apply techniques and new ways of thinking can help you strengthen your EI. For example, at Jane Ryan & Associates, we coach our clients on the following techniques. While they seem like no brainer’s—it is HOW you apply them that counts.

1. Stop, Breathe, Think then Speak (SBTS)

2. 5W’s and HOW

3. Listen Actively

4. Question Effectively

5. Paraphrase

6. Think Critically, Creatively, Strategically

7. Apply Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

8. Understand Personalities

9. Daily Focus & Mindfulness Time

10. Critical Reflective Journaling

If you would like to learn how to strengthen your emotional intelligence and you are ready to acquire the missing ingredient in your life and career—let us know and contact us today—we would love to help!  Call Coach Jane at 214-500-7223 or Email Coach Jane at [email protected] or Go to her website for more information at www.JaneRyanAssociates.com.  

Hey Leaders: Stop Thinking So Much and Just Do It!

Posted on June 2, 2016 at 6:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Hey Leaders: Stop Thinking so much and just do it! 

by Author, Daniel Gross, executive editor of strategy+business.

This article was published in strategy+business on March 25, 2015 and holds just as an important message today if not more for aspiring "Leaders".

The source: strategy+business: Corporate Strategies and News Articles on Global Business, Management, Competition and Marketing

Published: March 25, 2015

BUSINESS LITERATURE

“You can only learn what you need to know about your job and about yourself by doing it—not by just thinking about it.” That may be a strange way for someone who thinks about (and teaches and writes about) business for a living to start a book. And it certainly represents a fork from the increasingly well-trod intellectual path that celebrates mindfulness and introversion. But to Herminia Ibarra, it represents a truism: “Simply put, change happens from the outside in, not from the inside out.”

Those are just two of the many counterintuitive and easily digestible bits of wisdom in Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader. Concise, direct, and possessing a certain flair, Ibarra’s new book (her second) is a projection of her personality. A native of Miami and veteran of Harvard Business School, Ibarra since 2002 has taught at INSEAD in Paris, where she is the Cora Chaired Professor of Leadership and Learning and heads her department.

The book’s core message is simple and incisive. In an age of constant disruption, you better redefine yourself before the rapidly shifting sands of corporate America and technology redefine you. You have to act like a leader before you’re appointed to a leadership position, and you have to manage your own leadership path. The way to do it is by intentionally making yourself uncomfortable. Only be exiting your comfort zone can you develop “outsight”—the term she coins to describe the valuable perspective gained through actions.

 You have to act like a leader before you’re appointed to a leadership position.

To do so, people must overcome the gravitational pull of inertia. Ibarra notes that psychology and financial incentives push us to do more of what we are good it, and to get still better at it. But, she writes, “When we allocate more time to what we do best, we devote less time to learning other things that are also important.” And pursuing the comfort of our competencies can set us up for failure when circumstances change. A professional might spend decades thriving as a newspaper editor, or as a manager of a big-box electronics retail supply chain, or overseeing coal-mining operations—only to find that circumstances suddenly render his expertise significantly less valuable, even obsolete.

 To avoid this competency trap, Ibarra argues, people have to regard their jobs as platforms for building “outsight” and leadership capacities. How? By creating slack in your schedule so you can get involved in projects outside your core area and participate in extracurricular industry activities. By consciously making the effort to network with people who work in different industries and have different competencies. By finding a context or situation that makes you uneasy—giving a presentation, showing up at a conference for the first time, speaking up at an internal meeting. “Act as radically different from your normal behavior as you can,” she suggests.

Trying on a new identity at work may seem anathema to the rising cult of authenticity. But Ibarra urges readers to recognize how adhering strictly to behaviors that feel natural can inhibit career evolution. While everybody wants to be true to themselves, they can “hit a wall as they enter the transition to more senior leadership roles.” Ibarra notes that she has faced this dilemma in her own career. Starting to teach compelled her to make the adjustment from an academic researcher to someone who had to directly engage MBA students. Years later, when she was tapped to become a department chair at INSEAD, she felt the job was infringing on her capacity to do what she was best at—writing and teaching. “I wasn’t stepping up to leadership, because I didn’t think that leading was real work,” she writes. To gain outsight, Ibarra practiced some of what she preaches. She began networking outside her comfort zone, sought out board positions, and become involved with outside groups like the World Economic Forum.

Ibarra’s advice definitely cuts against the grain. As she put it in a recent interview with strategy+business, her argument calls into question the “long tradition of social psychology research that the way we think follows what we do, and not the other way around.” And humans tend not to focus on the need to build capacities before we actually need them.

There may be practical obstacles to acting like a leader in the way Ibarra suggests. “The actual advice I’ve given people is to try to carve out 10 to 15 percent of their time for side projects—networking events, connecting to people not in the immediate path of your operational responsibilities,” she said. But not every company or organization is designed to let employees have reliable slack in their schedules; if anything, the trend is in the opposite direction.

Also, the prescriptions may not work in every context. Ibarra concedes that the impulses that inform her book are characteristically American—the ability to network, to invent one’s self, and then to reinvent one’s self. In the U.S., “it’s a culture where hierarchical differences are minimized, and you can walk up to anybody and introduce yourself,” she said. “It’s not something you do as easily in France.”

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try. And it’s never too early to start. Becoming a leader, this valuable book reminds us, is a process, not simply an event. And it requires building a set of skills rather than following a series of prescribed steps. “Stepping up to leadership is more like becoming a great chef,” Ibarra writes, “than following a recipe.”

Author Profile: Daniel Gross is executive editor of strategy+business.

Adaptive Learning and Engaging Every Learner in the Workplace

Posted on May 22, 2015 at 9:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Adaptive learning is the hot buzzword being talked about in education and business today. Adaptive learning is a method used to teach students and train employees using computers as interactive tools aiding the learner. By removing the “one size fits all” non-adaptive learning approach into a “tailor-made” learning environment students/employees learn more effectively. Tailor-made refers to the basic premise that student/employees learn better when information adjusts and aligns to their learning preferences and needs (Paramythis, Reisinger, and Kepler, 2013). Adaptive learning has become synonymous with the concept of personalized learning.

According to Adam Newman, founding partner of Education Growth Advisors, “Personalized learning is an umbrella term and is defined as a ‘pedagogical method or process that draws on observation to inform tailored student educational interventions designed to increase the likelihood of learner success.’” Adaptive learning began in psychology by B. F. Skinner, behavioral psychologist in the 1950s. Followed by the artificial intelligence movement in the 1970’s, however it lacked the sophistication of data-driven applications that are available today (Kasper, 2014). Today technology expands upon adaptive learning platforms and is used to drive consumer sites like Amazon and Netflix as well as progressive organizations using data analytics to better understand employee-learning preferences.

Adjusting to student/employee’s preferred learning style allows for personalization for a greater learning experience which then engages the employee in the learning process through interactions specific to what their needs are at any given time and by doing so helps them achieve optimal potential and performance. To effectively engage every learner in your workplace begins with understanding your employees (data analytics). Who are they? What are their strengths and where do they need to become stronger? What are their learning preferences based on gender and interests? Then taking this data and determining how to design and customize the instruction and training facilitation so that it is truly adaptive and applicable? This requires a fresh look at employee/workforce demographics, competencies and potential. It is important to understand what employees think (believe) about their potential and what employer’s think (believe) about their employee’s potential because this dramatically affects what type of design is needed to effectively engage learners to achieve optimal learning outcomes. Identifying the gaps and creating tailor-made content for all learners takes time, however, when all employees engage in learning organizations can reap the greatest return of this investment in their people and employee’s can learn more effectively and can then apply this new found knowledge more efficiently in the workplace. Knowledge is powerful!  

Sources:

Lemke, C. (2013). Intelligent adaptive learning: An essential element of 21st century teaching and learning. The Metiri Group. Retrieved from http//:www.dreambox.com/adaptive-learning#sthash.jstvaY9J.dpuf

Paramythis, A., Loidl-Reisinger, S., & Kepler, J. (2004). Adaptive Learning Environments and e-Learning Standards. Retrieved from http//:www.ejel.org

Spiro, K. (2014). eLearning trends leading to the end of the learning management system. Retrieved from http//:www.elearningindustry.com/5-elearning-trends-leading-to-the-end-of-the-learning-management-system

Research | Leaders in Transition Progressing Along a Precarious Path | DDI

Posted on May 20, 2015 at 5:45 PM Comments comments (0)

I came across this research and thought you would be intersted in reading these stats on the degrees of difficulty it is upon leaders in transition. 

Leaders in Transition Research

http/:www.ddiworld.com/ddi/media/trend-research/leadersintransition_tr_ddi.pdf

According to DDI World, Inc. in our analysis of leaders’ navigating the unknown, we compared different types of transitions based on degree of complexity. The bracketed results (below) indicates how much more difficult the transition is for leaders when likened to a lateral move.

• Relocating across countries [42 percent more]

• Relocating within country [18 percent more]

• Moving up one level [7 percent more]

• Moving to a new company [6 percent more]

• Moving business units [4 percent more].


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